Resources

Assessment


ISAT Science Performance Definitions
Grade 4

Exceeds StandardsMeets StandardsBelow StandardsAcademic Warning

EXCEEDS STANDARDS

11A & B (Inquiry)

Students use science concepts to consistently and accurately formulate questions on a scientific topic, collect data, and use scientific process skills such as observing, estimating, measuring data, and using a control. They use available technology and resources to construct charts and visualizations to display data. They report and display the results of individual and group investigations using a variety of approaches that might include multi-media presentations.

Students consistently and accurately identify a design problem and propose possible solutions. They can develop a plan and procedure to address the problem. They can build and test prototypes (e.g., students design, build, and test paper rockets) using quantitative measurements to record data. They can usually modify the plan or prototype based upon collected data.

12A & B (Life Science)

Students consistently and accurately describe and compare simple life cycles of plants and animals and the similarities and differences in their offspring. They are able to consistently record observations and record the life stages of life cycles (e.g., egg, larvae, pupa, adult). They are able to compare characteristics of offspring with their parents. They can categorize features as either inherited or learned. They can consistently describe relationships among various organisms (e.g., predator/prey). They can construct a simple food web. They can identify the physical adaptations of plants and animals that help them survive in different environments.

12C & D (Physical Science)

Students consistently and accurately identify and give examples of different types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical, and mechanical (e.g., mechanical energy is the energy of moving objects such as a car). They understand the difference between energy of motion and stored energy (e.g., chemical energy is stored such as gasoline). They can consistently and accurately identify and compare properties of solids, liquids, and gases. They understand the difference between a chemical and physical change. They can consistently identify types of motion as well as how actions determine reactions. They can identify simple machines such as a lever, inclined plane, and pulley. They can identify forces in nature (e.g., gravity, magnetism, friction).

12E & F (Earth & Space Science)

Students consistently and accurately identify and explain natural cycles of Earth’s land, water, and atmospheric systems. They understand patterns of weather and seasonal changes as well as weather phenomenon (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning). They can describe the effects of weathering and understand natural disasters such as earthquakes. Students can identify and classify recyclable materials. They can identify and explain natural cycles such as the Earth’s orbit around the sun and patterns in the solar system such as moon phases and the order of the planets. Students can usually identify easily recognized star patterns such as the Big Dipper.

13A & B (Science, Technology, and Society)

Students consistently and accurately demonstrate ways to avoid injury when conducting science activities (e.g., not to taste unknowns, using caution when using electricity). They can explain why similar investigations may not produce similar results. Students understand the importance of keeping accurate and detailed records. They can explain how technology is used in science for a variety of purposes. They can usually describe major effects on society of scientific and technological innovations throughout time (e.g., transportation, medicine). They can consistently recognize the effects of technology on the lives and careers of people. Students can consistently compare the relative effectiveness of reducing, reusing, and recycling various products and materials. They can understand how specific personal choices such as recycling or societal choices such as protecting endangered species affect ecosystems.

return to top

MEETS STANDARDS

11A & B (Inquiry)

Students are usually able to formulate questions on a scientific topic, collect data, and use scientific process skills. Skills include observing, estimating and measuring and constructing charts and visualizations to display data. Students are usually able to produce reasonable explanations of a scientific process. Students are usually able to report results of individual and group investigations. These students usually show knowledge in being able to identify a design problem, develop a plan to solve the problem, build and test a prototype (e.g., students design, build, and test paper rockets), assess and report the results on the design problem, and modify the plan based on collected data.

12A & B (Life Science)

Students are usually able to describe and compare the simple life cycles of plants and the similarities and differences in their offspring. They can usually recognize and describe the stages of life cycles (e.g., egg, larvae, pupa, adult). They can usually compare characteristics of offspring with their parents. They can usually describe relationships among various organisms and their environments (e.g., predator/prey). They can usually construct a simple food web. Students can usually identify physical adaptations of plants and animals that help them live in different environments.

12C & D (Physical Science)

Students usually identify and give examples of different types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical, and mechanical (e.g., mechanical energy is the energy of moving objects such as a car). They understand the difference between energy of motion and stored energy (e.g., chemical energy is stored such as gasoline). They can usually identify and compare properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Students understand the difference between a chemical and physical change. They can usually identify types of motion as well as how actions determine reactions. They can usually identify simple machines such as a lever, inclined plane, and pulley. They can identify forces in nature (e.g., gravity, magnetism, friction).

12E & F (Earth & Space Science)

Students are usually able to identify and explain natural cycles of Earth’s land, water, and atmospheric systems. They understand patterns of weather and seasonal changes as well as weather phenomenon (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning). They can usually describe the effects of weathering and understand natural disasters such as earthquakes. Students can usually identify and classify recyclable materials. They can usually identify and explain natural cycles such as the Earth’s orbit around the sun and patterns in the solar system such as moon phases and the order of the planets. Fourth grade students can usually identify easily recognized star patterns such as the Big Dipper.

13A & B (Science, Technology, and Society)

Students usually demonstrate ways to avoid injury when conducting science activities (e.g., not to taste unknowns, using caution when using electricity). They can usually explain why similar investigations may not produce similar results. Students understand the importance of keeping accurate and detailed records. They can usually explain how technology is used in science for a variety of purposes. They can usually describe major effects on society of scientific and technological innovations throughout time (e.g., transportation, medicine). They can usually recognize the effects of technology on the lives and careers of people. Students can usually compare the relative effectiveness of reducing, reusing, and recycling various products and materials. They can understand how specific personal choices such as recycling or societal choices such as protecting endangered species affect ecosystems.

return to top

BELOW STANDARDS

11A & B (Inquiry)

Students are occasionally able to formulate questions on a scientific topic, collect data, and use scientific process skills. Skills include observing, estimating and measuring and constructing charts and visualizations to display data. Students are occasionally able to produce reasonable explanations of a scientific process. Students are occasionally able to report results of individual and group investigations. These students occasionally show knowledge in being able to identify a design problem, develop a plan to solve the problem, build and test a prototype (e.g., students design, build, and test paper rockets), assess and report the results on the design problem, and modify the plan based on collected data.

12A & B (Life Science)

Students are occasionally able to describe and compare the simple life cycles of plants and the similarities and differences in their offspring. They can occasionally recognize and describe the stages of life cycles (e.g., egg, larvae, pupa, adult). They inconsistently compare characteristics of offspring with their parents. They inconsistently describe relationships among various organisms and their environments (e.g., predator/prey). They can occasionally construct a simple food web. Students inconsistently identify physical adaptations of plants and animals that help them live in different environments.

12C & D (Physical Science)

Students occasionally identify and give examples of different types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical, and mechanical (e.g., mechanical energy is the energy of moving objects such as a car). They can occasionally explain the difference between energy of motion and stored energy (e.g., chemical energy is stored such as gasoline). They can occasionally identify and compare properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Students understand the difference between a chemical and physical change. They inconsistently identify types of motion as well as how actions determine reactions. They occasionally identify simple machines such as a lever, inclined plane, and pulley. They inconsistently identify forces in nature (e.g., gravity, magnetism, friction).

12E & F (Earth & Space Science)

Students are usually able to identify but may not be able to explain natural cycles of Earth’s land, water, and atmospheric systems. They occasionally understand patterns of weather and seasonal changes as well as weather phenomenon (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning). They can occasionally describe the effects of weathering and understand natural disasters such as earthquakes. Students can occasionally identify and classify recyclable materials. They can occasionally identify and explain natural cycles such as the Earth’s orbit around the sun and patterns in the solar system such as moon phases and the order of the planets. Students can occasionally identify easily recognized star patterns such as the Big Dipper.

13A & B (Science, Technology, and Society)

Students occasionally demonstrate ways to avoid injury when conducting science activities (e.g., not to taste unknowns, using caution when using electricity). They seldom explain why similar investigations may not produce similar results. Students do not understand the importance of keeping accurate and detailed records. They seldom explain how technology is used in science for a variety of purposes. They can occasionally describe major effects on society of scientific and technological innovations throughout time (e.g., transportation, medicine). They can occasionally recognize the effects of technology on the lives and careers of people. Students occasionally compare the relative effectiveness of reducing, reusing, and recycling various products and materials. They can understand how specific personal choices such as recycling or societal choices such as protecting endangered species affect ecosystems.

return to top

ACADEMIC WARNING

11A & B (Inquiry)

Students are rarely able to formulate questions on a scientific topic, collect data, and use scientific process skills. Skills include observing, estimating and measuring and constructing charts and visualizations to display data. Students are rarely able to produce reasonable explanations of a scientific process. Students are seldom able to report results of individual and group investigations. These students rarely show knowledge in being able to identify a design problem, develop a plan to solve the problem, build and test a prototype (e.g., students design, build, and test paper rockets), assess and report the results on the design problem, and modify the plan based on collected data.

12A & B (Life Science)

Students are rarely able to describe and compare the simple life cycles of plants and the similarities and differences in their offspring. They inconsistently recognize and describe the stages of life cycles (e.g., egg, larvae, pupa, adult). They inconsistently compare characteristics of offspring with their parents. They rarely describe relationships among various organisms and their environments (e.g., predator/prey). They can rarely construct a simple food web. Students inconsistently identify physical adaptations of plants and animals that help them live in different environments.

12C & D (Physical Science)

Students inconsistently identify and give examples of different types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical, and mechanical (e.g., mechanical energy is the energy of moving objects such as a car). They rarely explain the difference between energy of motion and stored energy (e.g., chemical energy is stored such as gasoline). They inconsistently identify and compare properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Students seldom understand the difference between a chemical and physical change. They inconsistently identify types of motion as well as how actions determine reactions. They rarely identify simple machines such as a lever, inclined plane, and pulley. They inconsistently identify forces in nature (e.g., gravity, magnetism, friction).

12E & F (Earth & Space Science)

Students inconsistently identify and explain natural cycles of Earth’s land, water, and atmospheric systems. They seldom understand patterns of weather and seasonal changes as well as weather phenomenon (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning). They can not describe the effects of weathering or understand natural disasters such as earthquakes. Students inconsistently identify and classify recyclable materials. They can rarely identify and explain natural cycles such as the Earth’s orbit around the sun and patterns in the solar system such as moon phases and the order of the planets. Students rarely identify easily recognized star patterns such as the Big Dipper.

13A & B (Science, Technology, and Society)

Students inconsistently demonstrate ways to avoid injury when conducting science activities (e.g., not to taste unknowns, using caution when using electricity). They can not explain why similar investigations may not produce similar results. Students do not understand the importance of keeping accurate and detailed records. They seldom explain how technology is used in science for a variety of purposes. They inconsistently describe major effects on society of scientific and technological innovations throughout time (e.g., transportation, medicine). They inconsistently recognize the effects of technology on the lives and careers of people. Students rarely compare the relative effectiveness of reducing, reusing, and recycling various products and materials. They rarely recognize how specific personal choices such as recycling or societal choices such as protecting endangered species affect ecosystems.

return to top

Return to Content Area Archive

return to ISAT page