Illinois Learning Standards

Stage C - Social Science



Descriptors



14A —

Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
  1. Distinguish between different kinds of rules and responsibilities as applied in the home, school, and community.
  2. Identify some class or school rules that were determined through democratic decision-making.
  3. Explain some reasons for having rules and laws governing the lives of people.
  4. Identify the names of people who occupy government offices in their community, state, and federal government.
  5. Explain why people vote and run for political offices in a democracy.
  6. Name historical figures from diverse backgrounds who advanced rights of individuals and groups to promote the common good.

14B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Identify current leaders within their local governments.
  2. Name both the current President and Vice President of the United States.
  3. Identify the current Governor of the State of Illinois.
  4. List the names for the levels of government found throughout the United States (city, county, state, federal, or national).
  5. List the three branches of government found within the state and federal government.
  6. State the names of the two houses of the U.S. Congress.
  7. Compose a definition of "state government."
  8. Explain the role that state governments play in the lives of people.
  9. Explain how local government has an influence over the lives of people in their community (e.g., they create speed limits, rules about allowing pets to run free).
  10. List some examples of government services in their communities that serve to help people and improve their lives (e.g., libraries, park programs, employment offices).

14C —

Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
  1. List examples of various ways responsible students work together to help classmates.
  2. Identify examples of rights and responsibilities students share within a school.
  3. Predict the benefits of acting responsibly in their classroom.
  4. Describe ways in which more than one classroom can work together to help their school.
  5. Determine rules for choosing classroom leaders.
  6. Compose a definition for the term "representation."
  7. Explain why in a democracy people choose to vote on important issues or for offices.

14D  —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Explain what is meant by the idea of "the common good of the people."
  2. Describe a situation wherein the common good supercedes the interests of individuals.
  3. Explain why people join public interest groups (e.g., PTA, historical societies, non-governmental organizations).
  4. Identify some non-profit agencies or civic groups that serve the common good (e.g., Red Cross).

14E —

Students who meet the standard can understand United States foreign policy as it relates to other nations and international issues.
  1. Describe an example where the people of the United States and people from other countries might need to cooperate to solve a common problem.
  2. Tell about people who have come from other countries to live in the United States.

14F —

Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
  1. Identify examples of people who are famous for being honest and truthful (e.g., Abraham Lincoln returning change).
  2. Define the concept of "Patriotism."
  3. Identify reasons why people have chosen a democracy for their plan of government.
  4. Define the concept of "liberty."
  5. Identify an artistic expression (e.g., song, painting, film) that illustrates the traditions important to our political system and concept of freedom.
  6. Recognize the state flag and motto of Illinois.
  7. Explain the purpose of the Pledge of Allegiance.

15A —

Students who meet the standard understand economic systems, with an emphasis on the United States.
  1. Explain why a choice must be made, given an example of a limited resource and a list of alternative uses for the resource.
  2. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of distributing a good or service in different ways.
  3. List jobs people do to earn wages.
  4. Identify producers of goods and services in the community.
  5. List the sources of money in their life, and identify money they receive for work.

15B —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by consumers.
  1. Match a list of wants with an example of a good, service, or leisure activity that satisfies each want.
  2. Identify a consumer choice made by families and explain why a choice had to be made.
  3. Choose from among three or more items and identify the opportunity cost as the next best alternative.

15C —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by producers.
  1. List examples of producers in the economy and identify what they produce.
  2. Classify productive resources as human, natural, and capital.
  3. Explain that productive resources are limited.

15D —

Students who meet the standard understand trade as an exchange of goods or services.
  1. Describe a trade students have made and explain how each person gained in the exchange.
  2. List examples of exchanges families make, with and without money.
  3. Describe how money makes exchange easier.

15E —

Students who meet the standard understand the impact of government policies and decisions on production and consumption in the economy.
  1. Distinguish between public goods and services and private goods and services.
  2. Describe examples of public goods and services in the community or state.
  3. Identify governments as the providers of public goods and services.

16A —

Students who meet the standard can apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation.
  1. Construct a timeline for a given period.
  2. Place a series of randomly ordered events at their proper locations on a timeline.
  3. List the important details contained in an image of life in the past.
  4. Draw a general conclusion about life during a specific period in a specific region or place using a combination of historical sources (e.g., images, artifacts, texts).
  5. List places to look for sources of information about the past.
  6. Tell why the location of where an event occurred helps to explain why and how it happened.

16B —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
  1. Arrange a series of significant events in United States political history in chronological order (e.g., American Revolution, Civil War, World War II). (US)
  2. Describe events and ideas in the life of a significant political figure or group from the past whose holiday we celebrate today. (US)
  3. Describe the images/icons on local monuments that commemorate local events or people (e.g., cemetery, slides or pictures of monuments, public buildings). (US)
  4. Arrange a series of significant events in world political history in chronological order (e.g., Egyptians and pyramids, Knights and castles, the Berlin Wall). (W)
  5. Identify a turning point in the political history of the world. (W)
  6. Describe key events in the life of a significant political figure or group from the past. (W)

16C —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of economic systems.
  1. Arrange a series of significant events in United States economic history in chronological order (e.g., railroad, automobile, space travel). (US)
  2. Identify changes in how people in the local community made their living from one historical period to another. (US)
  3. Explain how the changes in the ways people made a living have influenced modern society. (US)
  4. Arrange a series of significant events in world economic history in chronological order (e.g., light bulb, television, computers). (W)
  5. Describe the ways in which various groups in an ancient civilization made their livings during a specific time period. (W)
  6. Compare how people in a specific place or region in an earlier period made a living with how people make a living today. (W)
  7. Describe how changes in the economic choices in the past affected a society and its environment and political life. (W)

16D —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
  1. Arrange a series of significant events in United States social history in chronological order (e.g., Colonial slavery, freeing the slaves, women's right to vote). (US)
  2. Describe how key figures and organizations influenced the social history of the local community. (US)
  3. Tell about the life of people of various social status in the community/United States in the past. (US)
  4. Tell about the origin of a family or community tradition or custom. (US)
  5. Arrange a series of significant events in world social history in chronological order (e.g., invention of writing, printing press, computer). (W)
  6. Describe traditions and customs of past cultures. (W)
  7. Compare how families and other groups of people lived in a past culture with how families and other groups of people in the community live today. (W)

16E —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world environmental history.
  1. Arrange a series of significant events in United States environmental history in chronological order (e.g., steel plow, railroad, automobiles). (US)
  2. Compare the features of the physical environment as described in a myth or a legend of the people from one region of the United States with those described in the myth or legend of another people (e.g., Paul Bunyon and Johnny Appleseed). (US)
  3. Tell how people, goods, and services moved from one place or geographic region to another in the past. (US)
  4. Analyze a graph or chart containing data that shows changes in aspects of the physical environment over time. (US)
  5. Give an example of how the knowledge of geography increases an understanding of the history of the people in a place or region of Illinois and the United States. (US)
  6. Arrange a series of significant events in world environmental history in chronological order (e.g., beginning of agriculture, rise of cities, destruction of rainforest). (W)
  7. Name the three major grain crops that sustained people in early world civilizations. (W)
  8. Tell why knowledge of geography is necessary to understand the history of the people in a place or region. (W)

17A —

Students who meet the standard can locate, describe and explain places, regions and features on Earth.
  1. Locate the community, Illinois, United States, and North America relative to other places on a globe.
  2. Draw a map that shows the location of several landmarks in the community relative to the school.
  3. Locate places on a map, which has a number/letter grid reference system.
  4. Identify the major elements of a map and explain their use (e.g., title, scale, legend/key, directional indicators).
  5. Draw a sketch map of the community, which shows its physical and human characteristics.
  6. Point out the location of the poles, the equator, and the hemispheres on a globe and/or a map.

17B —

Students who meet the standard can analyze and explain characteristics and interactions of Earth's physical systems.
  1. Identify examples in the local community of ways in which the physical environment is harmed by human activities.
  2. Illustrate how people have littered, damaged, or improved a local ecosystem.
  3. Give examples of reducing, reusing, and recycling.
  4. List things damaged by a storm, flood, tornado, or earthquake by using a local media source.

17C —

Students who meet the standard can understand relationships between geographic factors and society.
  1. Identify how people use tools and machines to obtain resources and change the physical and human environment in their community and in other places.
  2. Classify a list of resources into renewable and nonrenewable.
  3. Draw pictures showing how open land in and around your community might be used.
  4. Predict where people might choose to live using a map showing rivers, lakes, marshes, plains, and mountains.

17D —

Students who meet the standard can understand the historical significance of geography.
  1. Illustrate how technological developments have been used to alter the physical environment of the local community (e.g., of or about automobiles, electricity, and computers by using pictures and stories).
  2. Create a map and draw pictures showing ways that students would like their neighborhood to change in the future.
  3. Depict ways students would like their community's physical and human environment to change in the future using maps or images.
  4. Arrange in chronological order pictures of house types and explain the changes that have occurred over time (e.g., log cabin, southern colonial, contemporary ranch).

18A —

Students who meet the standard can compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts, traditions, and institutions.
  1. Define culture.
  2. Define ethnicity, and contrast it with culture.
  3. Identify cultures other than the student's own.
  4. Explain the significance of the cultural diversity of the United States.
  5. Describe aspects of the community that reflect its cultural heritage.

18B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.
  1. Give examples of laws that people must follow.
  2. List activities that are important to society (e.g., education, religion, entertainment).
  3. Identify the major social institutions within a community (e.g., schools, churches).
  4. Identify local institutions that offer help or aid (e.g., fire stations, police stations, hospitals).

18C —

Students who meet the standard can understand how social systems form and develop over time.
  1. Describe the concept of conflict.
  2. Describe the concept of cooperation.
  3. Describe how individuals work together to obtain food, clothing, and shelter.
  4. Define division of labor.

Return to Social Science Classroom Assessments and Performance Descriptors