Illinois Learning Standards

Stage G - Social Science



Descriptors



14A —

Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
  1. Compare and contrast responsibilities shared between the state and federal governments.
  2. Identify the rights and principles of limited government found within the Declaration of Independence.
  3. Classify the type of courts and judicial officials established to operate within the local, state, and federal governments.
  4. Describe the role of the courts in judicial review.

14B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Describe the impact of the federal government's system of checks and balances (e.g., the results of a presidential veto).
  2. Analyze historical examples of the system of checks and balances according to the respective branches of the federal government.
  3. Compare similarities and differences in the powers of the Governor of the State of Illinois and the President of the United States to resolve conflicts and crises.
  4. Formulate a conclusion about the use of power by state or national governmental executives.
  5. Describe the organization of the Illinois General Assembly.
  6. Define "jurisdiction" as it applies to a court system.

14C —

Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
  1. Describe the requirements for candidates for local, state, and national offices.
  2. Compare the platforms of two or more political parties during an election to determine differences.
  3. Explain the position on a particular issue of a candidate for political office.

14D  —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Explain the importance of an individual's responsibility to maintain a democratic, civil society.
  2. Evaluate the benefits of highly involved citizens to a society.
  3. Identify the reasons for public opinion polls sponsored by political parties, public interest groups, and the media.
  4. Describe methods of communication that individuals, groups, and the media use to present information to the public.
  5. Interpret political cartoons in terms of captions and images to persuade people to accept political positions on various issues.

14E —

Students who meet the standard can understand United States foreign policy as it relates to other nations and international issues.
  1. Review the principles the United States has traditionally held in joining international organizations (e.g., the interests and benefits of world peace, open trade over closed markets).
  2. Explain an historical event in which the United States played a leading role.
  3. Analyze an event or issue that links the people of Illinois to another nation (e.g., issues or negotiations over trade, immigration of ethnic groups).

14F —

Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
  1. Provide an argument justifying the need for civil rights for citizens of any nation.
  2. Summarize the historical development of the concept of individual liberty (e.g., Colonial America to contemporary political interest groups).
  3. Analyze the causes and effects of when national interests have called for the limitation or restriction of civil rights (e.g., internment of Japanese Americans during World War II).

15A —

Students who meet the standard understand economic systems, with an emphasis on the United States.
  1. Explain that consumer demand determines what producers will produce in a market economy.
  2. Identify the productive resources households sell to businesses and the payments received for those resources.
  3. Identify the goods and services businesses sell to households and the payments received for those goods and services.
  4. Identify times when students or adults are consumers and when students or adults are producers.

15B —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by consumers.
  1. Explain why people are both consumers and producers.
  2. Identify markets where buyers and sellers meet face-to-face and markets in which buyers and sellers never meet directly.
  3. Explain the benefits to consumers of competition among sellers.
  4. Analyze the impact on prices of competition among buyers.

15C —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by producers.
  1. Analyze how changes in price affect producer behavior.
  2. Identify non-price incentives to which people respond in the economy.
  3. Explain why people's response to an incentive may vary because of differing values.
  4. Predict the impact on supply of a good or service when non-price determinants change (e.g., number of producers; cost of production).

15D —

Students who meet the standard understand trade as an exchange of goods or services.
  1. Identify exports produced in the local community or state.
  2. Explain why countries benefit when they exchange goods and services.
  3. Explain how specialization usually increases productivity in an economy.
  4. Provide examples of how specialization increases interdependence among consumers and producers.
  5. Explain how technological changes have led to new and improved products.
  6. Explain how people's incomes reflect choices they have made about education, training, skill development, and careers.

15E —

Students who meet the standard understand the impact of government policies and decisions on production and consumption in the economy.
  1. Identify laws and government policies that protect property rights, enforce contracts, and maintain competition.
  2. Explain why there is a role for government in the economy.
  3. Explain how laws and government policies affecting the economy have changed over time.

16A —

Students who meet the standard can apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation.
  1. Place events from a chronology on multiple tier timelines that are organized according to political, economic, environmental, and social history.
  2. Organize a series of related historical events for depiction on a periodization chart.
  3. Describe life during a specific period using multiple tier timelines, periodization charts, graphs, and charts with data organized by category.
  4. Provide an example of two different interpretations of a significant event.
  5. Explain how a significant historical event can have many causes.

16B —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
  1. Identify the major periods in United States political history from colonial to contemporary times. (US)
  2. Summarize ideas that influenced the development of representative democracy as reflected in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. (US)
  3. Describe significant events that fostered the development of representative democracy after the adoption of the United States Constitution (e.g., amendments, supreme court rulings, legislation). (US)
  4. Compare and contrast the contributions of individuals or political groups who had a significant impact on the course of local, state, and national history. (US)
  5. Identify causes and effects of turning points in world political history (e.g., the division of the Roman empire, the rise of the Islamic empire, the establishment of the kingdom of Ghana, the rise and fall of the T'ang dynasty). (W)
  6. Describe political beliefs of significant individuals and groups during a turning point in world history. (W)
  7. Compare/contrast the development of the political ideology of significant individuals from a Western civilization with that of a non-Western civilization. (W)
  8. Describe political ideas developed within the non-Western world (e.g., theocracy, passive resistance). (W)
  9. Define the concept of Feudalism. (W)
  10. Describe the development of European nation states, 1200-1500. (W)

16C —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of economic systems.
  1. Identify the major periods in United States economic history from colonial to contemporary times. (US)
  2. Describe the impact of trade from 1500-1750 on the political, social, and economic lives, and the environment of Native Americans and European colonists. (US)
  3. Describe how changes in science and technology affected the exchange of goods and services over time among the people in colonial America. (US)
  4. Explain how changes in economic activity during an earlier period influenced subsequent historical events (e.g., increase in the labor supply and unionization, depression and the New Deal). (US)
  5. Identify the major periods in World economic history. (W)
  6. Describe the economic systems found in the Americas before the voyage of Columbus. (W)
  7. Evaluate the impact of the economic aspects of the voyage of Columbus on the social, political, and environmental conditions of the Americas. (W)
  8. Describe the impact on societies of long-term economic trends from 1000 to 1500 CE (e.g., long distance trade, banking, specialization of labor, urbanization, technological/scientific progress). (W)
  9. Compare/contrast the economic systems and institutions of an agricultural and an industrial society (W)

16D —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
  1. Describe the changes and continuity in various interest groups' (e.g., workers, business persons, politicians) perception of social status over time. (US)
  2. Compare and contrast family life in the early American period with another time period. (US)
  3. Describe the significance of social factors such as status, role, customs, traditions, norms, and values during a turning point in United States social history. (US)
  4. Analyze the significance of cultural diversity in the social history of the United States. (US)
  5. Identify the major periods in World social history (e.g., European Feudalism, colonial periods in regions of the world). (W)
  6. Describe the impact of slavery upon various societies. (W)
  7. Compare/contrast the institution of slavery in different societies past and present. (W)
  8. Describe the origins, development, and consequences of mass migrations of people at selected periods in history. (W)
  9. Explain the significance of changes in the role of men, women, and children from one period to subsequent periods in world social history. (W)

16E —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world environmental history.
  1. Identify turning points in United States environmental history. (US)
  2. Describe the development of transportation and communication networks (e.g., river travel, pony express, internet). (US)
  3. Explain how the environment affected economic and social developments of people in a specific region of the United States (e.g., Jamestown, "Wild West," natural disasters). (US)
  4. Explain how the environment affected economic and social developments of a specific cultural group after 1500. (US)
  5. Explain how the environment, economy, and society can be affected by the dependence of a region on a single crop or mode of production. (US)
  6. Identify the major periods in World environmental history. (W)
  7. Describe the development of transportation and communication networks before 1500CE. (W)
  8. Describe the development of transportation and communication networks since 1500CE. (W)
  9. Identify watershed events in the environmental history of each continent since 1500CE. (W)
  10. Explain how the environment affected economic and social developments in a specific civilization (e.g., Greeks and the Aegean Sea, Middle East and oil). (W)
  11. Explain how the environment, economy, and society can be affected by the dependence of a region on a single crop or mode of production. (W)

17A —

Students who meet the standard can locate, describe and explain places, regions and features on Earth.
  1. Compare sketch maps with atlas maps to determine the accuracy of physical and cultural features (e.g., political/physical maps of Canada, the United States, and Europe).
  2. Develop maps and flowcharts showing major patterns of movement of people and commodities (e.g., international trade in petroleum, countries that produce and those that consume resources, cartograms, population pyramids).
  3. Explain the purposes and distinguishing characteristics of selected map projections, globes, aerial photos, and satellite images.
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the spatial distribution of various phenomena by using latitude and longitude to plot data on a base map of the United States or the world (e.g., location of professional sports teams in the U.S. or the world).

17B —

Students who meet the standard can analyze and explain characteristics and interactions of Earth's physical systems.
  1. Explain how Earth-Sun relationships affect Earth's energy balance (e.g., heating of soil and water at different seasons of the year, differential heating at different latitudes).
  2. Identify and describe different climates in terms of precipitation and temperature and the types of plants and animals associated with each using pictures, maps, and graphs.
  3. Analyze maps to determine the relationship among climate, natural vegetation, and natural resources.
  4. Predict the effects of an extreme weather phenomenon on the physical environment (e.g., a hurricane's impact on a coastal ecosystem).

17C —

Students who meet the standard can understand relationships between geographic factors and society.
  1. Explain the different patterns in population density using geographic tools (e.g., pyramids, maps).
  2. Identify human induced changes in landforms, climate, natural vegetation, and resources of their local community, state of Illinois, nation, and the world.
  3. Analyze physical and human environments in Illinois and the United States to determine ways that people adapt to and modify their environment.
  4. Formulate several hypotheses about relationships among resources, manufacturing and service industries, transportation, and population densities in different regions of the United States and the world.
  5. Predict the effects of an extreme weather phenomenon on human populations in different regions of the United States and the world (e.g., hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes).
  6. Identify social, political, and economic factors that attract people to, and repel people from, urban centers.

17D —

Students who meet the standard can understand the historical significance of geography.
  1. Describe instances of how places can be changed or destroyed as a result of natural processes.
  2. Describe how humans have adapted to environmental changes caused by natural processes.
  3. Explain how human characteristics of a place are influenced by acculturation (e.g., Spanish culture in Middle and South America and the United States Southwest, Hindu and Muslim culture in Southeast Asia).
  4. Explain how an environmental change in one part of the world can affect places in other parts of the world over periods of time.

18A —

Students who meet the standard can compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts, traditions, and institutions.
  1. Describe what is studied within the field of anthropology.
  2. Describe how a culture is reflected in its art, music, and/or architecture and institutions.
  3. Explain how technology and the media have impacted expressive culture.
  4. Analyze examples of patterns within literature, art, music, and/or architecture being transmitted from place to place.

18B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.
  1. Describe what is studied within the field of sociology.
  2. Describe what is studied within the field of psychology.
  3. Identify examples of how social, political, and economic institutions work together.
  4. Analyze the reasons why social institutions change over time.
  5. Identify how an individual may influence institutional or group behavior.
  6. Analyze the roles that various public and private institutions play as agents of socialization (e.g., schools).

18C —

Students who meet the standard can understand how social systems form and develop over time.
  1. Define the concept of diversity.
  2. Assess the impact that commonly held beliefs have had on social groups in the United States over time.
  3. Describe the contributions of significant individuals and groups to the common belief system of the United States.
  4. Describe how citizens and government can cooperate or have cooperated to solve an important social problem.
  5. Predict what social problems will become more pressing in the future.

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