Illinois Learning Standards

Stage H - Social Science



Descriptors



14A —

Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
  1. Evaluate the rights and responsibilities of the individual within the family, social groups, community, or nation.
  2. Categorize programs and services provided by governments into local, state, and federal levels.
  3. Compare the similarities and differences in the state of Illinois and the national government's attempts to protect individual rights and still promote the common good.
  4. Explain the influence of the Supreme Court and significant court decisions on the rights and responsibilities of citizens (e.g., defining, expanding, and limiting individual rights).
  5. Analyze the efforts of our court system to take into account the rights of both those accused of crimes and their victims.

14B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Compare the powers and responsibilities of the members of the House of Representatives and Senate within the United States Congress.
  2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of our federal system's separation of powers.
  3. Differentiate among the powers, limitations, and responsibilities of the state government of Illinois and the federal government.
  4. Distinguish between the powers and responsibilities of our state and federal courts as outlined in our state and national constitutions.
  5. Illustrate the organization of the three branches of the state government of Illinois.
  6. Justify why the Illinois Constitution cannot violate the United States Constitution.

14C —

Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
  1. Describe responsibilities that citizens share during an election.
  2. Compare/contrast the historical positions of political parties in elections.
  3. Compare historical examples of issues in local, state, or national elections affecting the civil rights of various groups.
  4. Describe how voting barriers have been removed to allow greater participation in elections (e.g., common people gaining the right the vote, minority voting status).
  5. Analyze an example of a government denying voting rights to individuals or groups.
  6. Describe the election process at local, state, and national levels (e.g., campaigns, primaries, conventions).

14D  —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
  1. Summarize the actions of an individual or group's effort to influence current public policy in their community, state, or nation.
  2. Compare and contrast the roles and influence of various individuals, groups, and media in shaping current public policy issues in their community, state, or nation.
  3. Measure political interest or activity in a civic or social cause.
  4. Predict how technology and social change will impact the conduct of political parties.

14E —

Students who meet the standard can understand United States foreign policy as it relates to other nations and international issues.
  1. Identify situations in which United States diplomacy favors one nation over another (e.g., trade, military protection).
  2. Compare the interests of the United States and other nations in making foreign policy decisions (e.g., defense, trade, environmental protection, communications).
  3. Compare/contrast the ideals and interests of the United States in participating in international organizations.
  4. Analyze cases of changing diplomatic relations between the United States and other people or nations (e.g., changing relations with Native American tribes, changing relations with the Soviet Union during and after World War II).
  5. Predict the effects of technology on foreign policy decision-making.

14F —

Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
  1. Summarize the historical influences on the development of political ideas and practices as listed in the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Illinois Constitution.
  2. Give examples of how United States political ideas and traditions have either included or denied additional amendments respecting or extending the rights of its citizens.
  3. Analyze an influential U.S. Supreme Court case decision and the impact it had in promoting or limiting civil rights.
  4. Compare arguments for expanding or limiting freedoms and protection for citizens outlined in the Bill of Rights.

15A —

Students who meet the standard understand economic systems, with an emphasis on the United States.
  1. Explain how the price of productive resources in a market economy would influence producer decisions about how, how much, and what to produce.
  2. Analyze the relationship between productivity and wages.
  3. Demonstrate the circular flow of interaction among households, businesses, and government in the economy.
  4. Describe the role of financial institutions in the economy.
  5. Identify the causes of unemployment.
  6. Define GDP.

15B —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by consumers.
  1. Explain why, as the market price of a good or service goes up, the quantity demanded by consumers goes down.
  2. Determine the market clearing price when given data about the supply and demand for a product.
  3. Predict how the change in price of one good or service can lead to changes in prices of other goods and services.
  4. Explain how prices help allocate scarce goods and services in a market economy.
  5. Explain why shortages and surpluses occur in a market economy and provide real-world examples of each.

15C —

Students who meet the standard understand that scarcity necessitates choices by producers.
  1. Provide examples of how changes in incentives encourage people to change their economic behavior in predictable ways.
  2. Provide examples of how the same incentive will bring about differing responses from differing people.
  3. Explain why, as the market price of a good or service goes up, the quantity supplied also goes up.

15D —

Students who meet the standard understand trade as an exchange of goods or services.
  1. Provide an example of comparative advantage in the school or community.
  2. Explain why comparative advantage leads to specialization and trade.
  3. Identify barriers to trade and their impact, and explain why nations create barriers to trade.
  4. Analyze the impact of an increase or decrease in imports on jobs and consumers in the U.S.
  5. Analyze the impact of an increase or decrease in exports on jobs and consumers in the U.S.
  6. Identify new technologies over time and explain their impact on the economy.

15E —

Students who meet the standard understand the impact of government policies and decisions on production and consumption in the economy.
  1. Identify examples of proportional, progressive, and regressive taxes in the economy.
  2. Evaluate the fairness and efficiency of each kind of tax.
  3. Analyze the benefits and costs to individuals and businesses of government policies that affect the economy.
  4. Identify the main sources of revenue for federal and for state governments.
  5. Explain how laws and government policies affecting the economy establish rules to help a market economy function effectively.

16A —

Students who meet the standard can apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation.
  1. Define the concept of a "watershed" event in history.
  2. Explain why a primary source may not necessarily provide an accurate description of an historical event.
  3. Identify the point of view of the author as found in a primary source document.
  4. Identify any inconsistencies of an author as found in a primary source document.
  5. Assess the value of posed and candid photographs as primary sources.

16B —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
  1. Evaluate the consequences of constitutional change and continuity over time. (US)
  2. Summarize the significant events that occurred during the development of the Supreme Court of the United States. (US)
  3. Describe the contributions of individuals or groups who had a significant impact on the course of judicial history. (US)
  4. Describe the significant events and contributions of individuals or groups in the development of United States diplomatic history. (US)
  5. Identify common political trends in the eastern and western hemispheres after 1500 CE (e.g., colonization, de-colonization, nationalism). (W)
  6. Analyze the political cause and effect relationships created by European exploration and expansion in the eastern and western hemispheres. (W)
  7. Identify the contributions of significant individuals to worldwide political thought (e.g., Locke, Burke, Marx) after 1500. (W)

16C —

Students who meet the standard understand the development of economic systems.
  1. Describe the impact of trade on political, social, economic, and environmental developments in a place or region of the United States, 1865 - present. (US)
  2. Explain how changes in science and technology affected the exchange of goods and services, economic institutions, and the movement of people among different regions of the United States, 1865-present. (US)
  3. Explain how entrepreneurs organized their businesses and influenced government to limit competition and maximize profits. (US)
  4. Describe the economic causes of conflict in United States History since 1865 (e.g., Indian Wars, Civil War, urban unrest). (US)
  5. Describe significant people, ideas, and events in the rise of organized labor from 1865-1914. (US)
  6. Analyze the impact of long-term economic trends on the political, social, economic, and environmental developments of societies in different parts of the world, 1500 CE to present. (W)
  7. Explain how changes in science and technology affected the exchange of goods and services among people of different geographical regions of the past. (W)
  8. Describe the global impact of long-term economic trends from 1500-present (e.g., long distance trade, banking, specialization of labor, urbanization, technological/scientific progress). (W)

16D —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
  1. Analyze the changing roles and status of men, women, and children from the colonial period through the 19th Century. (US)
  2. Compare the importance of people's customs and traditions during the historical development of a geographic region during the colonial/frontier periods and the 19th Century. (US)
  3. Describe family life of select groups of people during the colonial/frontier periods and the 19th Century. (US)
  4. Analyze the consequences of discrimination past and present. (W)
  5. Analyze the impact of mass migrations of people upon the political, economic, social, and environmental aspects of a world region. (W)
  6. Assess the impact of significant individuals or groups on world social history (e.g., religious leaders, philosophers). (W)
  7. Describe how the work of artists around the world (e.g., musicians, artists, filmmakers) reflects social issues. (W)

16E —

Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world environmental history.
  1. Analyze the social, political, and economic effects on the abandoned environment of a significant migration of people from one region to another. (US)
  2. Describe the demographic distribution of people before and after a significant migration in United States history. (US)
  3. Describe the effects on the environment of the dispersion of European colonists in North America after 1500CE. (US)
  4. Describe how major migrations have affected the cultural features of cities and rural communities in the United States. (US)
  5. Assess the effect of the industrial revolution on the physical environment in the United States. (US)
  6. Assess the effects on the environment of the historic process of suburbanization and rural depopulation. (US)
  7. Assess the effects of a significant past natural environmental disaster on the physical and cultural features of the landscape of a place or region in the United States. (US)
  8. Describe the social, demographic, political, and economic effects on the abandoned environment of a significant migration of people in World History. (W)
  9. Describe the environmental effects of the "Colombian Exchange." (W)
  10. Describe how major migrations have affected the cultural features of cities and rural communities. (W)
  11. Assess the effect of the industrial revolution on the physical environment in an industrialized country. (W)
  12. Assess the impact on the environment of the industrial revolution on a traditional agrarian culture. (W)
  13. Assess the effects on the environment of the historic process of suburbanization and the depopulation of rural regions. (W)

17A —

Students who meet the standard can locate, describe and explain places, regions and features on Earth.
  1. Translate a mental map into sketch form to illustrate relative location of, size of, and distances between geographic features (e.g., cities, mountains, rivers).
  2. Demonstrate understanding of how to display spatial information by constructing maps, graphs, diagrams, and charts to display spatial information (e.g., choropleth maps, climographs, population pyramids).
  3. Analyze patterns of movement in space and time (e.g., hurricane tracks over several seasons, the spread of influenza throughout the world).
  4. Describe the location of places using the global system of time zones.
  5. Demonstrate understanding of world time zones by determining the date and time in selected cities around the world in reference to Springfield, Illinois.

17B —

Students who meet the standard can analyze and explain characteristics and interactions of Earth's physical systems.
  1. Analyze climographs for selected places and suggest reasons for similarities and differences in climates.
  2. Hypothesize about the future effects of the use of technology on Earth's physical systems (e.g., climate, soil, air, water).
  3. Analyze the causes and effects of changes over time in physical landscapes (e.g., forest cover, water distribution, temperature fluctuations) as shown on maps, graphs, and satellite produced images.
  4. Predict the potential outcomes of the continued movement of Earth's tectonic plates (e.g., continental drift, earthquakes, volcanic activity).

17C —

Students who meet the standard can understand relationships between geographic factors and society.
  1. Explain the patterns of natural resource distribution (e.g., petroleum, timber) in various regions of the United States and the world.
  2. Identify reasons related to the natural environment that influence the location of certain human activities (e.g., corn production in Illinois, rice in Southeast Asia).
  3. Analyze rapidly growing urban centers to determine the impact of urban sprawl on the physical and human environment.
  4. Explain how human induced alterations of the environment have resulted in human migration (e.g., "Okies" from the Dust Bowl to California, the expanding Sahara).
  5. Rank natural hazards based on the degree of impact on people and the physical environment (e.g., loss of life, destruction of property, economic impact, alteration of ecosystems).

17D —

Students who meet the standard can understand the historical significance of geography.
  1. Describe how legacies of the past have affected past and present human characteristics of places (e.g., wealth and poverty, exploitation, colonialism and independence).
  2. Explain, in terms of "push-pull" factors, the major population movements that have occurred in the past and may occur among places and regions.
  3. Analyze maps of human settlement and routes traveled in the past to determine the relationship between where people lived and their movements.

18A —

Students who meet the standard can compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts, traditions, and institutions.
  1. Predict how technology/media will impact culture during the student's lifetime.
  2. Analyze immigration patterns to see how American cultures have been shaped.
  3. Identify various cultures that have combined to create a larger, multicultural American society.
  4. Define the concept of the global community.
  5. Draw conclusions about how the media creates and/or reinforces societal norms.
  6. Evaluate the role of the humanities (e.g., literature, art, music, architecture) in a culture.

18B —

Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.
  1. Describe how interaction among people brings about social change (e.g., natives and colonizers, Peace Corps volunteers).
  2. Explain how changing topics of self and groups (e.g., minorities, women, children, adolescents) have affected the roles of social institutions.
  3. Explain how the changing concept of social institutions affects groups in society (e.g., minorities, women, children, adolescents).
  4. Describe how such groups as social clubs, schools, and churches influence the preservation and transmission of culture.

18C —

Students who meet the standard can understand how social systems form and develop over time.
  1. Explain how diverse groups have enriched United States culture.
  2. Analyze how the ideals of the Founders have influenced the development of multicultural society in the United States.
  3. Explain the impact of prejudice on the operation of United States social, political, and economic institutions over time.
  4. Define cultural exchange and provide examples of cultural exchange between two groups.

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